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THE VET KILLED MY DOG

VETERINARIANS FROM HELL

SINGAPORE FACTS

WHAT IS REALLY GOING ON BEHIND THE VETERIANARIANS OFFICE

FICTION OR FACTS. YOU DECIDE

Wow’s that for a title? If it got your attention, that’s good because this topic needs your attention. Pets use to visit rarely. It is usually for a couple of vaccines, if they are not eating, perhaps a prescription diet and neither were pets loaded with constant heartworm preventives, flea and tick medicine, shampoos, dewormers, pharmaceuticals and more. Looking back, maybe that’s why our pets need not go to the vet all that often.

Veterinary medicine, science and technology has evolved. It is true that we not have better diagnostic equipment at our disposal, such as MRIs and more advanced surgery all thanks to the advancement of technology and tools. We think it’s great for vets and also our pets, having access to such modern life saving tools.

But somewhere along the way, Singapore veterinary practice lost perspective.

We are not talking about individual vets; I believe that most of them want to do right by our pets. But the problem is vets have allowed themselves to be influenced by the pharmaceutical companies and the dog food manufacturers – to the great detriment of our pets.

VETERINARY PROFESSION IS BROKEN

NOT ALL VETS ARE MADE THE SAME

The veterinary profession is broken and it isn’t about to change any time soon. Our pets are being over-serviced and we’re getting fleeced. We pay for the unnecessary vaccinations, the overly-processed, synthetic prescription pet foods that contain ingredients from China, and we pay for drugs and chemicals that are damaging to the immune system.

After shelling out for these services, pet owners need to keep their wallets open because, sooner or later, the chronic disease caused by these products like allergies and cancer will start to kick in and require treatment. They threaten the quality and quantity of life for our companion animals – and many of these diseases are caused by the products vets tell us are safe and effective.

The sad fact is, some common veterinary practices are harming our dogs. Vets today have too many drugs, vaccines and chemicals at their disposal and they’re OVERLY willing to dispense them. The worst part is, they hold no accountability for their actions. In short, they can and do ignore vaccine label recommendations or prescribe harmful or unnecessary drugs and we pet owners have no recourse.

If you do not believe me, ask your vet what are the exact compounds found in each of the drug they dispense. They probably would not know because a sales representative told them that this is good and the profit margins are high.

How could this happen?  How can vets cause so much disease and devastation in our dogs without even knowing it?

DOES VETERINARIANS KNOW IT ALL

IMMUNOLOGY | HOLISTIC ALTERNATE TREATMENTS

If you frequent this website and own a pet, chances are that finding a good holistic veterinarian, if you have not already found one, is a top priority in your life. But with so many vets out there marketing themselves as holistic these days, how can you really know for sure whether or not the vet you choose really is holistic and has the best interests of your pet in mind?

Unfortunately, many of the “holistic” vets we have encountered in the years since have willfully ignored eyeopening findings and continued to administer annual pet vaccines anyway. Even with publications of American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association in which it was clearly delineated that annual pet vaccines can lead to hypothyroidism and other chronic diseases in pets, many of the “holistic” vets in Singapore  continues to administer them regardless of the facts.

So how holistic is holistic? When looking for a vet to assist you in nursing your pet’s health, have this in mind. If you have doubts, ask questions first and research later. Vets has a habit of making something simple into a complex system, throwing around names that are confusing.

VETS THAT WE HAVE ENCOUNTER

DO YOUR RESEARCH BEFORE CONSULTING THIS PAGE. BELOW ARE JUST OUR PERSONAL EXPERIENCES

HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR VET

THIS IS A BIASED REVIEW FROM OUR EXPERIENCE

A veterinarian is your pet’s second-best friend.

When selecting a veterinarian, you’re doing more than searching for a medical expert. You’re looking for someone to meet your needs and those of your pet, a doctor who has people as well as animal skills. The worst time to look for a vet is when you really need one, so plan ahead and choose wisely.

Veterinarians often work with a team of professionals, including technicians and qualified support staff, so you’ll likely want to evaluate the entire vet team’s competence and caring. You should also consider the hospital’s location and fees when making a decision. Driving a few extra miles or paying a bit more may be worth it to get the care you want for your pet.

How to find the right veterinarian

The best way to find a good veterinarian is to ask people who have the same approach to pet care as you. Start with a recommendation from a friend, neighbor, animal shelter worker, dog trainer, groomer, boarding kennel employee or pet sitter.

If you’re looking for a specialist, ask about board certification. This means the vet has studied an additional two to four years in the specialty area and passed a rigorous exam.

Once you’ve narrowed your search, schedule a visit to meet the staff, tour the facility and learn about the hospital’s philosophy and policies. This is a reasonable request that any veterinarian should be glad to oblige. Write down your questions ahead of time.

What to look for in a veterinary practice

  • Is the facility clean, comfortable and well-organized?
  • Are appointments required?
  • How many veterinarians are in the practice?
  • Are there technicians or other professional staff members?
  • Are dog and cat cages in separate areas?
  • Is the staff caring, calm, competent and courteous, and do they communicate effectively?
  • Do the veterinarians have special interests such as geriatrics or behavior?
  • Are X-rays, ultrasound, bloodwork, EKG, endoscopy and other diagnostics done in-house or referred to a specialist?
  • Which emergency services are available?
  • Is location and parking convenient?
  • Do fees fit your budget, and are discounts for senior citizens or multi-pet households available?

Dr Jean Paul Ly

Senior Veterinarian

We have known Dr Ly for a very long time. He has very mixed reviews on the internet. It is a love or hate. You will love him if you belong to the group of pet owners that will give 101% and regardless of cost and action, you will want to save your pet. Dr Ly is not recommended to wishy washy pet owners.

Dr Benjamin Landon

Senior Veterinarian

LVS is the recommended place to go for a detailed CT Scan for your pet. Dr Landon is a Traditional Veterinarian and his compassion for animals is very similar to Dr Ly. He is also known for his excellent skills in surgery.

Dr Eugene Lin

Veterinarian | Founder of Animal Ark

Dr Eugene Lin has as much good reviews as Dr Jean Paul Ly. As a matter of fact, both of them work rather closely in the past. Personally, we feel that he is a man of real science and technology. We have not been disappointed by his constant search in modern science and Veterinarian treatments.

VETS THAT WE HAVE ENCOUNTER

DO YOUR RESEARCH BEFORE CONSULTING THIS PAGE. BELOW ARE JUST OUR PERSONAL EXPERIENCES

A veterinarian is your pet’s second-best friend.

When selecting a veterinarian, you’re doing more than searching for a medical expert. You’re looking for someone to meet your needs and those of your pet, a doctor who has people as well as animal skills. The worst time to look for a vet is when you really need one, so plan ahead and choose wisely.

Veterinarians often work with a team of professionals, including technicians and qualified support staff, so you’ll likely want to evaluate the entire vet team’s competence and caring. You should also consider the hospital’s location and fees when making a decision. Driving a few extra miles or paying a bit more may be worth it to get the care you want for your pet.

How to find the right veterinarian

The best way to find a good veterinarian is to ask people who have the same approach to pet care as you. Start with a recommendation from a friend, neighbor, animal shelter worker, dog trainer, groomer, boarding kennel employee or pet sitter.

If you’re looking for a specialist, ask about board certification. This means the vet has studied an additional two to four years in the specialty area and passed a rigorous exam.

Once you’ve narrowed your search, schedule a visit to meet the staff, tour the facility and learn about the hospital’s philosophy and policies. This is a reasonable request that any veterinarian should be glad to oblige. Write down your questions ahead of time.

What to look for in a veterinary practice

  • Is the facility clean, comfortable and well-organized?
  • Are appointments required?
  • How many veterinarians are in the practice?
  • Are there technicians or other professional staff members?
  • Are dog and cat cages in separate areas?
  • Is the staff caring, calm, competent and courteous, and do they communicate effectively?
  • Do the veterinarians have special interests such as geriatrics or behavior?
  • Are X-rays, ultrasound, bloodwork, EKG, endoscopy and other diagnostics done in-house or referred to a specialist?
  • Which emergency services are available?
  • Is location and parking convenient?
  • Do fees fit your budget, and are discounts for senior citizens or multi-pet households available?
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